Threadbird Celebrates 2 Years, Big Sales!

That’s right folks, it’s been 2 years since we rebranded Threadbird. We’re rolling out the red carpet as we celebrate and bringing on the deals for you! We’ve got $0.30 off per shirt on all t-shirt orders up to 3 colors. We’ve got 10% off all vinyl sticker orders. We’ve got 10% off all Screen Printed poster orders, not to mention a radical drop in poster pricing!
We’ve also cut our tag setups in half. Instead of the usual $10.00 per tag setup, they are now only $5.00 per setup.

Celebrate with us! Join in on the fun of our Threadbird sale. We love our customers and we wanted to come up with a special way to say thank you for making our jobs great.


Foalio Combines the Power of Portfolios and Creative Jobs, Offering Everyone Access to Amazing Artists and Designers

Foalio (http://www.foalio.com) has upped the ante on helping Artists find Jobs. From the creators of Threadbird, Foalio offers free creative job listings and portfolios.

  • Foalio Home Page
  • Foalio Project Page
  • Foalio Projects Page
  • Foalio Artists Page

Over the past few years at Threadbird, we’ve received requests for artists and designers, from clients who need to hire one but don’t know where to look,” says Foalio Co-Founder Scott Anderson. “We saw a huge need to help jobs find artists.

Unlike other portfolio sites and job posting services, Foalio doesn’t charge anything to post a creative job listing. When jobs are posted, they can be seen and applied for by anyone browsing the site. Artists are also notified by email when a job is posted in their creative field, helping them get the work they need.

It’s not uncommon that people searching for an artist are on a tight budget,” says Foalio Co-Founder Nick Rocccanti. “Most sites are charging $100-200 just to post a job. If your budget is $300, you’ve just spent half of it and still don’t have an artist! We want everyone to have fair access to hiring the right artist.

Foalio also includes the following features:

  • Artist portfolios to showcase projects, descriptions, links and items for sale
  • Browse projects and artists to find the style you are looking for
  • Share projects and jobs on Twitter, Facebook and via email
  • Resume builder for easy access to more info on an artist
  • See which artists are currently available for hire
  • Mark an item as “Pre-Made” and sell it as a ready-to-go template

For more information, please visit http://www.foalio.com.


Common Printing Misconceptions: Screen Printers Can Print Samples

One of the most common questions and misconceptions clients have when it comes to screen printing is that they will be able to get a “sample” print before their entire run is printed. While rules are made to be broken I can guarantee that almost every screen printing company in America will not print you a sample without charging you a fortune and here is why. To understand why screen printers can not print samples is to first understand the screen printing process.

First thing you must take note of is that screen printing is indeed a “process” that involves several steps before your t-shirt can come to life. While I am not going to go into deep details here are the basic steps for the screen printing process.

1. Preparing art for print

Art is separated by color into different layers. This is done because with the screen printing process each color in a design requires a separate screen. For example a five color print will require 5 different screens which layered on top of each other will form the final image.

2. Films:

While not all screen printing companies use photo emulsion, a lot of them do and here is the process. Basically the original image is transferred onto an overlay such as acetate, usually by photocopying. This is once again done for each layer in the design.

3. Screens:

Each piece of photocopied acetate is then burned onto the emulsion covered silk screen using ultraviolet light. The areas that are clear harden the emulsion. After this the screens are washed and the areas of emulsion that were not exposed to the light get washed away leaving you a negative of each layer of the artwork.

4. Printing:

Each screen is then attached to the printing press where each layer/color is laid down individually by squeegeeing ink through the screen and onto your tee. This is done for each layer until you have your final image.

5. Drying:

After all layers have been laid down on top of each other and the final image has been created, each tee is sent through a high powered dryer to cure the ink and form your final product.

As you can see even when breaking down the process to the simplest form there are a ton of steps involved in bringing a t-shirt to life. Each step requires labor, time and of course money.

The setup process is truly the most expensive part of screen printing. Once a press is setup and ready to go it really doesn’t make that much of a difference if you are running 50 tees or 500 tees. When you increase your total quantity it allows the screen printer to eat up a lot of their overhead cost. This is why you get a much better price break when going with a larger quantity of tees!

As you can see without even looking at the individual costs for screens, films, ink, labor, and the tee itself making just one t-shirt as a sample is an extremely expensive and time consuming operation to pull off! Remember it is called the “Screen Printing Process”, and it is indeed a process.

There is however a bright side when printing with Threadbird, you are provided a photo-realistic example of how your tees will turn out! While of course nothing ever beats having the real thing in hand, having a photo-realistic mock really helps a client and printer get on the same page as far as placement, size and color. Whenever you are printing make sure that your screen printer always provides you with a mock up before they go to print.

Threadbird Mock Approval Sample

So the next time your screen printer tells you that they can not print you a sample, just know that it is nothing personal it is just all apart of the process.


How to pick the right sizes for your t-shirt order

You have spent months working with your artists and designers getting your vision exactly how you want it on a t-shirt. You are all set and about to place your first t-shirt order with your screen printer (hopefully Threadbird ) and then it hits you. What size tees should I order?! I can say from experience there is really nothing worse than losing a potential customer because you do not have their size!

So what size tees should you order?

Unfortunately there is no magic answer, equation or rule to answer this question. Conventional thought is that you should order with a 1-2-2-1 ratio and honestly if you have no clue where to start it is not a bad ratio to follow. A lot of customers will be able or willing to go up a size in a tee and try to shrink it. Weighing everything more towards the middle just makes common sense with the thought that the majority of people fall somewhere in the middle and thus you will be covered most of the time.

There has to be a better way!

Although there is no magic formula and it always seems like you run out of the size you need, knowing your customer base is really the key to getting your tee order right. After several runs and releases of different lines with your company you will and should start to be able to see a pattern of what sizes are selling best. But if this is your first release I recommend trying to stereotype your customers as much as possible. Yes, stereotyping is usually not a good thing, but in this case it could really help you.

Know your customer

Really think about whom your customer is and what type of demographic they fit into. For this I’ll use a first hand example. I run a company called Pong Deck that makes a game that goes along with Beer Pong. Aside from our Pong Deck game we also sell a few t-shirts. When ordering these tees, I literally took into consideration that most beer pong players, like to drink copious amounts of beer and thus not all of them are in the most fit shape and are a bit larger than the Warped Tour emo crowd. So when placing my order I made sure to heavily weigh my ratio towards XL and 2XL shirts. On the other hand if your demographic is the emo crowd whom love skinny jeans and tight shirts you probably aren’t going to be ordering a ton of XL shirts. I know it sounds mean to stereotype your customers, but you have to be honest with who your demographic is, because you are trying to meet their needs!

Bottom line, know your target market to the best of your abilities.
Of course there is no perfect solution when ordering sizes, just try and do your best to put yourself in the shoes of your market and if all else fails resort to the 1-2-2-1 method.

Cheers,
Adam Hendle
adam@threadbird.com
@iamthetrend


Common Misconceptions: Screen Printers Carry Stock

In this series of articles, I am going to attempt to uncover some of the most common misconceptions that customers have about screen printing. Hopefully through these articles the world of screen printing will make more sense to you and lift the veil of mystery behind how your t-shirts actually get made.

The first misconception that customers have about screen printers is that they actually stock t-shirts on their shelves. A few years ago, when I was getting shirts printed for my band, I just assumed that the screen printer had all the t-shirts on hand. Working at Threadbird has shown me that many people have the same assumption.

So lets talk a bit about the reasons, positives and negatives, why most screen printing companies don’t carry stock themselves.

Reason #1: Too many brands, styles and colors

Let’s use our most popular selling t-shirt, the American Apparel 2001 unisex tee, as an example. The AA 2001 alone (not including the AA 2001 Organic) comes in almost 60 different colors and 7 different sizes! Take a moment to envision how much warehouse space would be required to stock that inventory. Now multiply those numbers out over the 30+ styles of standard crew neck t-shirts that Threadbird offers…

Reason #2: Manufacturers, wholesalers and shipping times

There are wholesalers out there that specialize in buying stock directly from manufacturers. These companies warehouse and ship stock to screen printers within a matter of days! They have the warehouse space, buying power and shipping power and play a vital step in the success of getting your t-shirts to us, allowing us our to concentrate on our specialty, screen printing.

Reason #3: Money, money, money…

Most importantly, not stocking inventory allows us to keep costs down and keep customers happy.

Does ordering stock slow down the process?

The entire screen printing process (normally) takes around two weeks to complete and getting stock only takes a matter of days which really never effects the customer. The only times there might be an issue are if a customer changes their mind on what stock they want after an order is placed or suppliers (occasionally) run out of certain sizes or colors. Having stock run out is not very common, but can happen from time to time. In the event that certain stock does run out, Threadbird is excellent at finding you a comparable option.

How will I know if I like the feel and fit?

Threadbird will gladly order sample blanks for you so that you know exactly how the shirt will feel, fit and look. Never hesitate to ask your Threadbird rep if you have questions on blanks or if you really want a hands on approach have them order you some blanks and compare for yourself!

We hope this helps! Stay tuned for the next installment of Common Misconceptions…

Cheers,
Adam Hendle
adam@threadbird.com
@iamthetrend


Threadbird Artist Series: Walk In Love

After a shimmering, successful launch of Threadbird 2.0, we bring you back to the 4th installment of the Threadbird Artist Series! This month we’re featuring long time faves, Walk In Love Clothing. Let us introduce you to T.J. and Brooke Mousetis…


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